Frequently Asked Questions


1. Are you launching a magazine? When will it be available? I heard you're giving out free copies of the first issue, too — how do I get mine?

Our print publication, Milk Street Magazine, is available now. To get your free copy of the first issue (this is not one of those sneaky subscription offers — you won’t receive an invoice or a bunch of bills in the mail), subscribe, and more, head over to our magazine page.
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2. What about television? Will you be airing a new TV show? When and where can I watch it?

The pilot episode of Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Television was shot in Fall 2016. Christopher Kimball will be hosting the show, and we have lots of new co-hosts, guests, and cooks that we’re excited about. The first season will air on public television starting September 2017. American Public Television will distribute the show, and they will be co-presenters along with WGBH Boston (Chris is a public media die-hard!). Now, what should we do about the silly costumes?
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3. How do I make sure I get the new show on my local TV station?

If you'd like to see our TV show on your local television station, email your request (and your location) to tv@milkstreetkitchen.com.
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4. I love seeing Chris on Cook's Country. Will he still host that show?

You can catch Chris on a new season of Cook’s Country in Fall 2016. It'll be his last season as host of that show, so don't miss it!
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5. I love your public radio show and podcasts. Will I still be able to listen to them?

Our weekly public radio show and podcasts will continue with Christopher Kimball as host. Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio features Chris alongside co-host Sara Moulton and weekly guests from the culinary world and beyond. You can listen on your local public radio station (stay tuned for our station finder), iTunes, Stitcher, or TuneIn.
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6. When does your cooking school open? Where’s it located? How do I find out about courses and class timings?

The Milk Street Cooking School is open! You can view course listings and book a class. Most courses will be held in the evenings, will usually last for three hours, and will be held at our headquarters at 177 Milk Street, Boston, Massachusetts.
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7. Will there be more on your website than there is now?

We’re working on building out a full-fledged site, the first phase of which will go up later this year. You can expect to see a more robust website beginning in early 2017.
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8. I don’t live in the Boston area but would love to take a cooking class with you. Will you offer classes online?

Not in Boston? Not a problem. In 2017, we'll launch an online cooking school, which will be closely aligned with our brick-and-mortar cooking school.
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9. I’d love to see Christopher Kimball in person. Is he going on tour anytime soon?

If you missed your chance to see Chris on tour this go-around, don't fret. Future live dates are in the works. To be one of the first to know, sign up for our email list
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10. Are you hiring?

We have some positions open already and will be adding more over the coming months. Go to our job listings to see if there's something that sparks your interest and for instructions on how to apply.
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11. I don’t want to miss a thing! How do I stay informed about everything Milk Street is up to?

Sign up for our mailing list! Every few weeks, we’ll send you one of Christopher Kimball’s favorite recipes, a cooking video, tips and techniques, or a personal letter from Milk Street. 
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12. I have a media / TV / radio inquiry. Whom do I contact?

For press & media inquiries, email Deborah Broide at press@177milkstreet.com
For TV station inquiries, email Nancy Bocchino at tv@177milkstreet.com
For radio station inquiries, email Kathleen Unwin at radio@177milkstreet.com.
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13. Why the name “Milk Street”?

We’re located on historic Milk Street in downtown Boston, in the erstwhile Flour & Grain Exchange Building. Milk Street was given its name in 1708 after a milk market that was located here; it’s also the street where Benjamin Franklin was born.
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