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Milk Street Recipe

Korean Chicken and Vegetable Stew

45 minutes

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Korean Chicken and Vegetable Stew

This spicy, umami-filled stew is called dakdoritang in Korean. The flavor backbone comes from soy sauce and gochujang, a Korean fermented chili paste. Look for gochujang, packed in red plastic containers or bottles, in the international aisle of supermarkets or in Asian grocery stores. If you like, drizzle with sesame oil or sprinkle with toasted sesame seeds before serving. Steamed white rice is the perfect accompaniment.

4-6

Servings

Tip

Don’t use russet potatoes in place of the Yukon golds. Because of their high starch content, russets break down easily when fully cooked and may turn the stew thick and murky; Yukon golds, however, have a creamy-dense texture and will hold their shape.

45 minutes

Reviews
Cathy B.
September 25, 2022
Skin-on? Potatoes and carrots delish! But chicken, meh
As-is, this is not a dish I will make again. As others have noted, the broth is flavorful. And, I love the description of it being not stew, but not not stew. Not sure why we were advised to use skin-on, bone-in. This made it hard to serve, and unappealing to eat (soggy skin). If I make again, I would either use skinless, or maybe even rotisserie chicken added to the dish later on. We didn't eat ANY of the chicken leftovers, but the leftover potatoes and carrots were a huge hit.
Cathy B.
September 12, 2022
Fast! But bland. Not a stew, not not a stew.
Like others, I found this pretty bland. (Also, like another, I made with stock instead of water and still found this pretty bland.) I doubt I'll make this again, with so many other dinner options out there. Certainly inoffensive and relatively fast! Also - was confused how to serve it -- it's called a stew, but with the chicken being skin-on, bone-in, you kind of have to use a plate.
Andrew S.

A simple but flavorful recipe. I found the amount of liquid was slightly too much, making it feel a little closer to a soup than a stew. I'd use a little less next time. Also I don't think the chicken skin contributes much here, so I'd either take it off or use boneless and skinless thighs.

Paul B.

Just quibbling: why would you pay dry the chicken when you’re adding it to 5 cups of water? Seems like a needless step.

April D.

Paul - while patting dry is not as critical in this recipe as in ones where you are going to brown the chicken, it is still good practice to pat your chicken dry before adding it to the stew. The reason for this is that packaged chicken can include varying amounts of added juices; patting the chicken dry ensures that you don't add more liquid than intended to the stew. Also, those juices can contribute a muddled, murky flavor and color to the stew.

Best,
The Milk Street Team

Julie A.

I’m with Andrew about the skin. Next time I’ll either brown the chicken first or go skinless/ one less. I ended up pulling the chicken out and removing the skin and bones. It was great after that!

Barbara S.

Very enjoyable. A lot of broth, as mentioned by others, but very flavorful broth! I thought the amount of potatoes was going to be too much, but it was just right. I would definitely make it again.

Jennifer B.

Right, way too much broth. I cooked with the skins and then then gave them to my dogs. Everyone was happy.

Scott P.

I'm glad I made it, and it is hearty, but I found the flavors not very pronounced. I'm wondering if the recipe might be better served by swapping chicken broth for the water.


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