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Fried scallions—and their flavorful oil—season this simple noodle dish
Milk Street Bowtie Shanghai-Style Scallion Noodles with Ground Pork

Shanghai-Style Scallion Noodles with Ground Pork

35 minutes

Shanghai-Style Scallion Noodles with Ground Pork

Free

The Shanghainese dish called cong you ban mian combines wheat noodles with fried scallions, the flavorful oil that results from frying them and salty, savory soy sauce. A lot of deep, bold flavor is wrested from a small handful of ingredients. Cutting the scallions into thin strips before cooking requires a little knifework but allows them to crisp evenly and quickly. And once fried, they integrate nicely with the noodles rather than fall to the bottom of the bowl. Ground pork makes our version hearty enough to serve as a main dish. Dried Asian wheat noodles about the size of thin spaghetti work well in this recipe; non-instant dried ramen is a good choice, as are thin lo mein noodles (don’t use wide, flat lo mein). A sprinkle of thinly sliced fresh chilies, though not traditional, balances the richness of the dish and adds a welcome kick of heat.

2 bunches scallions
10 ounces dried Asian wheat noodles (see note)
⅓ cup grapeseed or other neutral oil
8 ounces ground pork
⅓ cup soy sauce
3 tablespoons white sugar
Kosher salt
1-2 Fresno or jalapeños chilies, stemmed and sliced into thin rounds (optional)
Ingredients
  • 2

    bunches scallions

  • 10

    ounces dried Asian wheat noodles (see note)

  • cup grapeseed or other neutral oil

  • 8

    ounces ground pork

  • 3

    tablespoons white sugar

  • Kosher salt

  • 1-2

    Fresno or jalapeños chilies, stemmed and sliced into thin rounds (optional)

Directions
  1. 01
    In a large pot, bring 4 quarts water to a boil. While the water heats, cut the scallions into 2- to 3-inch lengths, then slice lengthwise into thin strips, reserving the whites and greens separately. To the boiling water, add the noodles, then cook until tender (refer to package instructions for cooking times). Drain in a colander and rinse under cold water until cool to the touch; set aside.
    See Demo
    shanghai-style-scallion-noodles-1
  2. 02
    In a large skillet over medium, heat the oil until shimmering. Add the scallion whites and cook, stirring occasionally, until golden brown, 5 to 7 minutes. Add about half of the scallion greens and cook, stirring occasionally, until well-browned and beginning to crisp, another 5 to 8 minutes. Using tongs or a slotted spoon, transfer to a bowl and set aside.
    See Demo
    shanghai-style-scallion-noodles-2
  3. 03
    Add the pork to the oil remaining in pan and cook over medium, stirring to break the meat into small pieces, until the meat is well-browned and crisp, 7 to 10 minutes. Stir in the soy sauce and sugar, then bring to a simmer, scraping up any bits stuck to the pan.
    See Demo
    shanghai-style-scallion-noodles-3
  4. 04
    Reduce to low and add the noodles and fried scallions. Cook, tossing to combine, until the noodles are heated through, about 1 minute. Remove from the heat, then taste and season with salt. Toss in the remaining scallion greens. Divide among individual bowls and top with fresh chilies (if using).
    See Demo
    shanghai-style-scallion-noodles-4
Tip: Don’t forget to add about only half the scallion greens to the skillet. The rest are used fresh at the end. Also, don’t stir the scallions or pork too frequently; this slows down the browning and crisping process.
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Comments
  • Deni H.

    One of my new favorite recipes. Complex and deep in flavor.

    0 votes
    0 comments
  • christine d.

    I doubled the recipe because I had a whole pound of pork. Doubling the soy sauce made this very salty - I would thin it out a with some water next time (or maybe get the low sodium one). Otherwise, we liked this and would make it again.

    0 votes
    0 comments
  • Samantha O.

    Not a favorite of ours. Could have been due to our noodle selection (buckwheat soba) but we just thought it was lacking in flavor and texture.

    0 votes
    1 comments
    • Michael K.

      I don't think buckwheat is a good fit for the other flavors. I used udon. And I definitely added the chiles...not on the bowl, but in the dish for the last minute of cooking. Pretty tasty, I thought. Simple, but tasty.

      1 votes
      0 comments
  • Michael K.

    This worked out great. Making it for a second time tonight.

    0 votes
    0 comments
  • Richard S.

    This is a staple, a keeper. Simple, delicious, a bit uncommon. This is what Milk Street is all about...this and many other amazing recipes.

    0 votes
    0 comments
  • Christopher H.

    Looks incredible! Any good suggestions for gluten-free alternatives for noodles?

    0 votes
    1 comments
    • Myrna A.

      I will try this with Shirataki noodles- low carb and gluten free

      0 votes
      0 comments
  • Julie P.

    Our store was out of pork. We made this with ground chicken and it was delicious. Would work really well as a salad or lettuce wrap. We will try it soon with the pork. Really simple, really good.

    0 votes
    0 comments
  • Jay G.

    Great recipe. Have done this twice, once with the ground pork, and another time with shrimp as alluded to in the article. I think the dish could handle slightly more pork - I might try 12 ounces next time.

    0 votes
    0 comments
  • Katie F.

    Very tasty! My whole family (including small, sometimes picky children) enjoyed this. I'm going to experiment with slightly less oil next time, as the finished dish was a little oily for my taste.

    0 votes
    0 comments
  • Jarrett P.

    We added garlic, ginger, sesame oil, and some rice vinegar at the end. Probably the vinegar was the most key. Tried it first without and very bland. With the vinegar- quite tasty and resembles the dish as we have had it in Shanghai.

    1 votes
    0 comments
  • Vince S.

    Excellent recipe. followed it exactly and it was awesome. has become part of my repertoire.

    0 votes
    0 comments
  • Janeth O.

    We really liked this. The second time I added a splash of sesame oil which really added a nice nuttiness to the flavor. I might try this with my garden green beans once they come in.

    0 votes
    0 comments
  • Sandie G.

    While also not traditional, I added a little bit of Chinese Five Spice powder to my pork at the end of cooking and that made for a nice flavor profile. I would probably add the chilis next time, but my husband and I enjoyed it just fine. I would also undercook the noodles just a little next time, like you would for Italian-style noodles, as I felt that the noodles got a little soft after adding to the sauce.

    0 votes
    0 comments
  • Barb M.

    Fantastic - I only had spaghetti noodles, so I “ramenized” them, a technique I learned from the Milk Street team - worked perfectly. This will be a staple recipe in our home.
    thanks for your creative and delicious recipes -

    0 votes
    0 comments
Down arrow

Shanghai-Style Scallion Noodles with Ground Pork

Get Ready to Cook

4

Servings

35 minutes

Tip

Don’t forget to add about only half the scallion greens to the skillet. The rest are used fresh at the end. Also, don’t stir the scallions or pork too frequently; this slows down the browning and crisping process.

Ingredients
  • 2

    bunches scallions

  • 10

    ounces dried Asian wheat noodles (see note)

  • cup grapeseed or other neutral oil

  • 8

    ounces ground pork

  • 3

    tablespoons white sugar

  • Kosher salt

  • 1-2

    Fresno or jalapeños chilies, stemmed and sliced into thin rounds (optional)

Step 1 of 4

Cook Noodles

2
bunches scallions
10
ounces dried Asian wheat noodles

In a large pot, bring 4 quarts water to a boil. While the water heats, cut the scallions into 2- to 3-inch lengths, then slice lengthwise into thin strips, reserving the whites and greens separately.


To the boiling water, add the noodles, then cook until tender (refer to package instructions for cooking times). Drain in a colander and rinse under cold water until cool to the touch; set aside.

Step 2 of 4

Brown Scallions

cup grapeseed or other neutral oil

In a large skillet over medium, heat the oil until shimmering. Add the scallion whites and cook, stirring occasionally, until golden brown, 5 to 7 minutes.


Add about half of the scallion greens and cook, stirring occasionally, until well-browned and beginning to crisp, another 5 to 8 minutes. Using tongs or a slotted spoon, transfer to a bowl and set aside.

Step 3 of 4

Cook Pork

8
ounces ground pork
cup soy sauce
3
tablespoons white sugar

Add the pork to the oil remaining in pan and cook over medium, stirring to break the meat into small pieces, until the meat is well-browned and crisp, 7 to 10 minutes. Stir in the soy sauce and sugar, then bring to a simmer, scraping up any bits stuck to the pan.

Step 4 of 4

Combine Ingredients

Reduce to low and add the noodles and fried scallions. Cook, tossing to combine, until the noodles are heated through, about 1 minute. Remove from the heat, then taste and season with salt. Toss in the remaining scallion greens. Divide among individual bowls and top with fresh chilies (if using).

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Shanghai-Style Scallion Noodles with Ground Pork

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