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A long rise and ample olive oil make the best focaccia
Milk Street Bowtie Tomato-Olive Focaccia

Tomato-Olive Focaccia

7¼ hours 40 minutes active, plus cooling

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Tomato-Olive Focaccia

Free

This recipe recreates the light, open-crumbed focaccia we ate in Bari, Italy. To achieve that texture, the dough must be wet—so wet, in fact, it verges on a thick, yet pourable batter. Resist the temptation to add more flour than is called for. Shaping such a sticky, high-hydration dough by hand is impossible. Instead, the dough is gently poured and scraped into the oiled baking pan; gravity settles it into an even layer. If you have trouble finding Castelvetrano olives, substitute any large, meaty green olive. To slice the baked focaccia for serving, use a serrated knife and a sawing motion to cut through the crust and crumb without compressing it. If desired, serve with extra-virgin olive oil for dipping. For convenience, the dough can be prepared and transferred to the baking pan a day in advance. After it has settled in the pan, cover tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate. The next day, prepare the toppings. Uncover, top the dough with the olives and tomatoes and let stand at room temperature for 45 minutes, then finish and bake as directed.

12

Servings

Tip

Don't disturb the dough during its rise. And when transferring the dough to the baking pan, handle it gently. The goal is to retain as much gas in the dough as possible so the focaccia bakes up with an airy texture. Don't use a baking dish made of glass or ceramic; neither will produce a crisp, browned exterior, and glass is not safe to use in a 500°F oven.

7¼ hours

40 minutes active, plus cooling

500 grams (3⅔ cups) bread flour
5 teaspoons instant yeast
1 teaspoon white sugar
2 cups water, cool room temperature
8 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 ¾ teaspoons table salt, divided
1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved
1 cup Castelvetrano olives, pitted and halved (see note)
1 teaspoon dried oregano
3/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
Ingredients
  • 500

    grams (3⅔ cups) bread flour

  • 5

    teaspoons instant yeast

  • 1

    teaspoon white sugar

  • 2

    cups water, cool room temperature

  • 8

    tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided

  • 1 ¾

    teaspoons table salt, divided

  • 1

    cup cherry tomatoes, halved

  • 1

    cup Castelvetrano olives, pitted and halved (see note)

  • 1

    teaspoon dried oregano

  • ¾

    teaspoon ground black pepper

Directions
  1. 01
    In a stand mixer with the dough hook, mix the flour, yeast and sugar on medium until combined, about 30 seconds. With the mixer on low, drizzle in the water, then increase to medium and mix until the ingredients form a very wet, smooth dough, about 5 minutes. Turn off the mixer, cover the bowl and let stand for 10 minutes. Meanwhile, coat the bottom and sides of a large bowl with 2 tablespoons of oil; set aside.
    See Demo
    tomato-olive-focaccia-1
  2. 02
    Sprinkle 1 teaspoon of salt over the dough, then knead on medium until smooth and elastic, about 5 minutes; the dough will be wet enough to cling to the sides of the bowl. Using a silicone spatula, scrape the dough into the oiled bowl. Dip your fingers into the oil pooled at the sides of the bowl and dab the surface of the dough until completely coated with oil. Cover loosely with plastic wrap and let stand at room temperature for 5½ to 6 hours; during this time, the dough will double in volume, deflate, then rise again (but will not double in volume again).
    See Demo
    tomato-olive-focaccia-2
  3. 03
    After the dough has risen for about 4½ hours, heat the oven to 500°F with a baking steel or stone on the middle rack. Mist a 9-by-13-inch metal baking pan with cooking spray, then pour the remaining 2 tablespoons oil in the center of the pan; set aside.
    See Demo
    tomato-olive-focaccia-3
  4. 04
    When the dough is ready, gently pour it into the prepared pan, scraping the sides of the bowl with a silicone spatula to loosen; try to retain as much air in the dough as possible. The dough will eventually settle into an even layer in the pan; do not spread the dough with a spatula, as this will cause it to deflate. Set aside while you prepare the tomatoes.
    See Demo
    tomato-olive-focaccia-4
  5. 05
    In a medium bowl, use a potato masher to lightly crush the tomatoes. Scatter the olives evenly over the dough, then do the same with the tomatoes, leaving the juice and seeds in the bowl. If the dough has not fully filled the corners of the pan, use your hands to lightly press the tomatoes to push the dough into the corners. Let stand uncovered at room temperature for 20 minutes.
    See Demo
    tomato-olive-focaccia-5
  6. 06
    Drizzle the dough with the remaining 4 tablespoons oil, making sure each tomato is coated. Sprinkle evenly with the oregano, remaining ¾ teaspoon salt and the pepper. Place the pan on the baking steel or stone and bake until golden brown and the sides of the focaccia have pulled away from the pan, 20 to 22 minutes. Cool in the pan on a wire rack for 5 minutes Using a wide metal spatula, lift the focaccia from the pan and slide it onto the rack. Cool for at least 30 minutes before serving.
    See Demo
    tomato-olive-focaccia-6
Tip: Don't disturb the dough during its rise. And when transferring the dough to the baking pan, handle it gently. The goal is to retain as much gas in the dough as possible so the focaccia bakes up with an airy texture. Don't use a baking dish made of glass or ceramic; neither will produce a crisp, browned exterior, and glass is not safe to use in a 500°F oven.
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Reviews
Aria R.
September 10, 2022
On repeat!
We LOVE this recipe. I mill fresh spelt and the 100% whole grain does perfectly with this high hydration dough. It rises a little faster than with white flour. Delicious!
Stephanie L.
July 25, 2022
Lovvvvve!
So dang easy and has become a go to meal with a crisp acidic salad and a nice white wine. I don't repeat very many things, but this one is one that has now been repeated several times and will always make the cut. Thank you!
Sherry F.
July 20, 2022
Great For Entertaining!
Love to make this early in the day and serve late afternoon as a snack with guests.
Anthony M.
June 21, 2022
Summer Fave
I make this focaccia all summer. Takes time but it's very good! Excellent for picnics and potlucks.
Cynthia M.
June 20, 2022
So good!
I love this recipe. I have made this twice now and have never had any problem with sticking. I did have to leave it in the oven about 10 minutes longer than the directions say but that may just be my oven otherwise I followed the directions exactly. This tastes so good and I love the texture of the bread.
Alice B.

Can I double this recipe and cook in a half sheet pan?

Mark G.

You could try it but it might not rise as well since the half pans generally have shorter sides than the boxier 9x13 metal pans.

diane d.

you mention a substitute for the olives in the recipe. i am unable to find the note. thank you

Mark G.

You could use capers or sliced pepperoncini peppers with diced roasted red peppers or sliced/diced pickled jalapeños or pickled sliced artichoke hearts

Jody N.

It says any plain pitted green olive may be substituted.

Vandana M.

I just returned from Bari after spending two months there and learning to cook a lot of the local dishes. I have the "family recipe" for this focaccia which is MUCH easier and faster. This is not the authentic Bari focaccia. They use semolina and flour (about 50% each). A single round of proofing right in the baking dish. Takes just over one hour and then bake. Made it three times since I returned and tastes and looks exactly like what I had with the families and in the restaurants there. I don't understand the need for complicating a simple beautiful thing!

ann k.

Although I would guess the 6 to 7 hour proofing would add more flavor.

Jeanne C.

I would like to try making this your way too! Would you mind sharing your process? Thank you

Charron O.

Despite the generous amount of olive oil added to the pan prior to baking my bread stuck- we had to scrape it off. Tasted great but I’m not entirely sure what I did wrong.

Mariah G.

I had the same problem and I realized that I didn't spray the pan with cooking spray. You would think with all the additional EVOO dripping off the dough it wouldn't stick, but the sides need to sprayed. I made this again last night, remembered to spray and did not have an issue with sticking. As a side point, this is really simple and delicious to make...and great for sandwiches (minus the toppings).

Jennifer M.

I hate cooking spray - but a brush of melted butter works perfectly.

Elsie H.

I made this for New Years Eve dinner with Cioppino, and we all fell in love with this focaccia. I keep making it because it is so good, and if you have a stand mixer, surprisingly easy.!. For comparison, I made Milk Street’s Herbed Focaccia, and this is hands down, our preference. Just fabulous and addictive!

lucas f.

Is 5 teaspoons of instant yeast really what you meant? My dough was nearly boiling out of the bowl after 2 hours, then lost all lift.

Janelle C.

Hi Lucas,

5 teaspoons of instant yeast is correct! As mentioned in the instructions "the dough will double in volume, deflate, then rise again (but will not double in volume again)." Hope this helps.

Best,
The Milk Street Team

Katie L.

Absolutely delicious and the recipe was perfect. Follow it.

nancy b.

Just made this and it was fabulous. I added fresh oregano as I didn't have Mexican and added sliced dried chorizo and grated sharp provolone cheese. Everything else remained the same, down to the pizza steel in the oven. This is like no other focaccia I've ever tasted. It was moist and flavor-filled, especially the salt topping. Love it. And it was super easy with a stand mixer.

Claudia B.

This was amazing!!!! I substituted Kalamata olives (as I had them in my pantry) and they worked great for us. Can't wait to make it again.

Pattie M.

Could the second proof be in the pan and not the bowl. I had a very hard time getting the dough out of the bowl and it never filled the corners. Backed unevenly.

Janelle C.

Hi Pattie,

Our Recipe Developer, Julia Rackow says to go for it! Since the goal is to retain the air and to handle it as little as possible it should be fine. Just make sure you oil the pan generously.

Best,
The Milk Street Team

Robert P.

i made this and the short rib lasagna both are keepers in my world 6 stars out of five WONDERFUL will make many times thanks

Robert P.

one question the recipe here on the website says 4 Tbs olive oil my magazine says 8 Tbs olive oil i used 8 ??

Janelle C.

Hi Robert,

Thank you for flagging this! The recipe previously said 4 tablespoons olive oil, plus 1/4 cup for drizzling. We've edited it to 8 tablespoons to keep the recipe consistent with the magazine.

Best,
The Milk Street Team

JoAnn S.

I made this twice and it is excellent. I used an old round deep dish pizza pan which was great and made a beautiful round focaccia. I appreciate listing the ingredients by weight which is better than by volume.

Maura S.

Can I let the dough rest in the fridge over night after it rises for the 5 hrs at room temperature?

Janelle C.

Hi Maura,

It's important that the dough remains at room temperature so we don't recommend letting it rest in the fridge.

Best,
The Milk Street Team

Jennifer P.

But...the header notes for the recipe say that for convenience it can rest overnight in the fridge, in the pan, after the first rise? Is that wrong?

Lynn C.

Hi Jennifer -

The recipe prior to Janelle's post did not include make-ahead instructions. We revisited the recipe during TV filming (and after the recipe was published) at which time we tested some make ahead options and those were then added to the recipe headnote. We hope that clears up the confusion.

Best,
The Milk Street Team

Lynn C.

Hi Jennifer -

The recipe prior to Janelle's post did not include make-ahead instructions. We revisited the recipe during TV filming (and after the recipe was published) at which time we tested some make ahead options and those were then added to the recipe headnote. We hope that clears up the confusion.

Best,
The Milk Street Team

Jennifer P.

But...the header notes for the recipe say that for convenience it can rest overnight in the fridge, in the pan, after the first rise? Is that wrong?

Lynn C.

Hi Jennifer -

The recipe prior to Janelle's post did not include make-ahead instructions. We revisited the recipe during TV filming (and after the recipe was published) at which time we tested some make ahead options and those were then added to the recipe headnote. We hope that clears up the confusion.

Best,
The Milk Street Team

Lynn C.

Hi Jennifer -

The recipe prior to Janelle's post did not include make-ahead instructions. We revisited the recipe during TV filming (and after the recipe was published) at which time we tested some make ahead options and those were then added to the recipe headnote. We hope that clears up the confusion.

Best,
The Milk Street Team

Jay G.

I made this today and it came out perfectly. Halfway through adding the 1.5 tsp of salt at the end, it seemed a bit much, so I stopped there and it tasted great.

Christine C.

I made this the first time and turned out great. Second time, my dough is very lumpy and not smooth after the first five minutes of mixing. Mixed slightly longer and same. I ended starting over and still have the same lumpy problem. What am I doing wrong? Thanks!

Mary L.

This was fantastic! Best focaccia I ever made or tasted from anywhere. Will try some different toppings next time (but have to wait a bit as I ate the whole thing in 2 days). Thanks...it was perfect!

Eileen H.

This was fantastic! Made exactly as written. Great chewiness, crisp crust, perfect interior. Will definitely make again.

Jennifer B.

agree with all the reviewers, fantastic. the crust was ridiculously good.

Denise S.

I made this last night after a curbside grocery error resulted in my receiving 20 Campari tomatoes. I'm in Texas and the high yesterday was 79 degrees, so my dough doubled, fell, rose again and was ready to pour into the pan after 3 hours on the kitchen counter. It was so delicious! Crispy on the outside, soft and airy on the inside. I still have some tomatoes left and will likely make this again in a couple of days.

Terrence D.

Could sourdough starter be substituted for some of the levan?

Paul G.

During the show you mentioned that the bakery in Italy uses cast iron pans to bake it in. I am a big cast iron fan and want to know if you have tried this in a cast iron pan instead of a 9x13 metal pan?

Paul G.

Made this for the first time and it was absolutely the best ever focaccia including what I had in Italy. I love it so much that I've been trying to think of additional ways to have it - lunch, brunch, breakfast, etc. The problem is with the time period it takes to make it. With 5-6 hours of prep and rising and then an additional hour of putting in the pan, toppings, cooking and resting - this is an all day event taking about 7-8 hours total and really only works for dinner time or evening. Can you prepare the dough in the evening and let the dough sit and rise overnight for more the the 6 hours?

Virginia D.

In the notes section, there were these instructions.... "the dough can be prepared and transferred to the baking pan a day in advance. After it has settled in the pan, cover tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate. The next day, prepare the toppings. Uncover, top the dough with the olives and tomatoes and let stand at room temperature for 45 minutes, then finish and bake as directed."

Paul G.

Thank you Virginia D. I totally overlooked the notes section. I will give that a try and let you know how it came out.

Paul G.

Thank you Virginia D. I totally overlooked the notes section. I will give that a try and let you know how it came out.

Virginia D.

The whole family loved it - including the 4 year old. Although it takes 7-8 hours to make the vast majority of that is the dough hanging out in the bowl by itself. With 5 teaspoons of yeast, make sure to use the biggest bowl you have. Follow the recipe. It really works.

Dana T.

Could I have let it rise too long? I had a pan of gorgeous bubbly dough, but didn't quite get the open texture I was expecting. It doubled, fell and nearly doubled again during the rise. Don't get me wrong it was DELICIOUS, but the texture was like a quality pan pizza where I was expecting large holes. Comments or advice appreciated.

Lynn C.

Hi Dana -

It sounds like you followed the visual clues for rising, so I wouldn't think you let it rise too long. It's possible that you knocked too much air out of the dough when transferring it to the pan or pressing the dough into the corners. It might be helpful to watch the TV episode which can be found here - https://www.177milkstreet.com/tv/-italian-recipes - as a way to double check that everything looks the same as it does when we make it here. I was especially surprised by how gently Erika was when removing the dough from the rising bowl. Hope that helps!

Best,
The Milk Street Team

Dana T.

Oh no, I barely eased it to the baking pan and did not need to press at all. It had large bubbles on the surface going into the oven, that is why I thought maybe I let the structure get too weak.

Dana T.

Oh no, I barely eased it to the baking pan and did not need to press at all. It had large bubbles on the surface going into the oven, that is why I thought maybe I let the structure get too weak.

Sue F.

When you say, “large bowl” exactly how large? Mine is climbing out of a 4 quart bowl! Waaay more than doubled! I do have a larger plastic container I’ve used for slow rising breads. Could I use that instead?

Lynn C.

Hi Sue -

I would definitely switch to the large plastic container if it's bigger than your bowl. I don't have the exact volume, but I'd say it's a 5 or 6 quart bowl.

Best,
The Milk Street Team

cynthia b.

How deep does the 13 x 9 pan need to be? Would a 10 x 14 pan work? Thanks.

Lynn C.

Hi Cynthia -

The 9x13 metal baking pan we use is 2.25 inches deep. We would not recommend a 10x14 pan for this recipe. Having to press it even further to the corners of a larger pan would cause the dough to deflate too much.

Best,
The Milk Street Team

Michael Q.

For me it would be helpful if all of the baking ingredients were represented by weight as well as cups, tablespoons...

Joshua B.

I completely agree. It is so much easier to build on a scale.

Steve B.

As with many recipes that start with the words "in a stand mixer," I wanted to ask how to modify the technique if you don't have a stand mixer? I suppose you whisk the dry ingredients, then perhaps mix in the water with a wooden spoon, but do you continue to mix it that way that for five minutes? Then, how do you knead this dough by hand? If it is as wet and sticky as indicated, how do you do that without making a complete mess?

Ramona W.

There are only two of us, would we be able to halve this recipe to come out okay. Or how would this freeze if we made the whole recipe?

Lynn C.

Hi Ramona -

We haven't tested halving the recipe and we would only recommend doing so if you are measuring by weight, not volume (volume measurements get tricky when halved and can impact the way the recipe works). Make sure to bake in a deep enough pan - at least 2 1/4" deep.

Best,
The Milk Street Team

Jennifer B.

This, hands down is the best focaccia I have ever made. I made the topping excluding the tomatoes and olives and just used the herbs oregano and rosemary. So delicious. Happy!

Diana L.

Thank you for your comment! Your comment is currently under moderation and will appear shortly.

Alicia E.

Put the focaccia together yesterday. Excellent recipe with no real problems. The rise is significant. During the first rise the dough stuck to the loose plastic wrap covering the bowl. I gently pried it loose so the dough could fall and rise again. Worked out well. Used Kalamata olives because that is what I had on hand. Next time I will use an even larger bowl and spray the plastic wrap. Baked the bread in a 12 inch black carbon frying pan. Best focaccia I have ever made.

Franny S.

I'm confused about the times given for proofing... step two says let rise 5 1/2 to 6 hours, then step three says "after about 4 1/2 hours, preheat your oven." Is this an additional four and a half hours? and if so why not just say to let it rise for ten hours total? Am I missing a step here?

Lynn C.

Hi Franny -

The dough rises for 5 1/2 - 6 hours, however you need to start heating your baking steel/oven an hour before baking - in other words, at the 4 1/2 hour mark of the rising time. So in Step 3, at the 4 1/2 hour mark, heat your steel and oven and prepare your baking pan. Then, after another hour or hour and a half (total of 5 1/2 or 6) you can proceed with Step 4.

Best,
The Milk Street Team

Beth S.

The video has you adding 2 teaspoons of kosher salt to the dough but the recipe has table 1 teaspoon of table salt. If I wanted to use kosher salt, would it be 2 teaspoons and would that be Diamond Crystal or Morton’s?

Lynn C.

Hi Beth -

We recently changed to Morton's kosher salt for savory recipes and table salt for baking recipes, so the 1 teaspoon of table salt reflects that change (the video was shot before we made this change). If you're using Morton's kosher you should stick with 1 teaspoon but if you're using Diamond Crystal kosher you should use 2 teaspoons. You can read about why we made this change here - https://www.177milkstreet.com/2021/02/worth-our-salt.

Best,
The Milk Street Team

Ella W.

Will this freeze?

Lynn C.

Hi Ella -

We haven't tested this, but we think you could freeze the baked focaccia. Make sure to wrap it well before freezing. When you're ready to serve, allow it to defrost at room temperature and then refresh in a low oven (325 degrees) for 5 minutes or so.

Best,
The Milk Street Team

Alicia E.

I have frozen it w/ great success. Thaw and reheat @ 300 for about 15 minutes.

Alicia E.

I have frozen it w/ great success. Thaw and reheat @ 300 for about 15 minutes.

Jasmine B.

I used whole wheat bread flour (all I had) and the mixture definitely wasn’t wet or liquidy like on the show. Just wondering how much liquid (water and/or oil) should be adjusted with whole wheat. Mine rolled into an intact ball and is currently rising in the bowl. Fingers crossed!

Lynn C.

Hi Jasmine -

Since whole wheat flour still has the bran intact it requires more water to achieve the same texture as white flour. They are really two different animals and behave quite differently. Because of this the focaccia recipe would need to be fully redeveloped in order to use whole wheat flour.

Best,
The Milk Street Team

Nicole G.

This is such a reliable recipe! I've made it a few times, full-size and half, all successful. This last time I let it sit in the pan in the refrigerator for 20 hours, then took it out for the hour of oven-warming, and it came out perfectly.

Theresa L.

Any modifications if I don't have a pizza stone?

Lynn C.

Hi Theresa -

You can try just baking it in a 500 degree oven directly on the rack, but it's unlikely that the dough will get the same rise or the bottom will get the same level of browning without the baking steel/stone.

Best,
The Milk Street Team

Eric J.

Couple questions: 1. could this be used at a Detroit Style Pizza dough? 2. And instead of putting the dough in a bowl, could the dough directly into an oiled pan thus avoiding movement of the dough?

Lynn C.

Hi Eric -

We haven't tested this dough with sauce and cheese so we aren't sure if it will hold up to both of those and stay crispy. For your second question, I think Janelle answered a question above and consulted with one of our recipe developers would said to go for it! Since the goal is to retain the air and to handle it as little as possible it should be fine. Just make sure you oil the pan generously.

Good luck!
Best,
The Milk Street Team

Eric J.

Thank you for your response, Lynn. Good point about the tomatoes and cheese, just might deflate it - but eventually, I'll probably give it a try. I will try putting the dough directly into the pan, a 9 x 13, the next time I make it and will report back my results. FYI and for other readers....I made this focaccia recipe yesterday but didn't have a 9 x 13 pan at that time. Instead, I used my Detroit Style pizza pan - 10 x 14. I didn't have to touch the dough to stretch it but did give it about 20 minutes or so to settle and spread on its own while I was prepping the tomatoes and the olives. For the most part, the dough filled the pan, not perfectly level, but ample - and it cooked up great! I would like the dough to have a little more flavor though. Do you think a little more sugar would help / hurt? or Diastatic malt?

Frank B.

This is my favorite recipe from Milk Street. I have made it for work potlucks, family parties and plain old dinner. I have tried it with a small amount of cheese and thinly sliced dry salami...oh la la. I have also baked it in two 8 inch cake pans and cast iron skillets. The cake pans were good, they were great for personalized focaccia at a party. I prepped the dough and filled the cake pans and left them on the counter for the final rise before everyone arrived. My guests got add their choice of toppings, then I threw them in the oven...everyone went crazy! It was awesome.

Georgianne M.

I made this yesterday. It is definitely a kick-butt version of focaccia. I would like to try this with duxelles instead of the olives and tomatoes. I assume it will work. Has anyone tried using mushrooms/onions. I would think any liquid would have to be drained before putting it on the dough b/4 baking. I will make this again, possibly for Thanksgiving. It sure beats dinner rolls!

Donald N.

This recipe was perfect as written. Castelvetrano olives are my favorite so that was a bonus. Honestly, I didn't know focaccia could be this good.

Cynthia M.

This was fantastic! I baked it in a 9 x 13 baking pan that was only 1 inch deep. I made a makeshift tray out of aluminum foil to put under the pan as I was concerned that the oil might spill over during cooking. Baked on a pizza stone that because of logistics I could only preheat for 30 minutes. It came out perfectly.

Mary D.

If there is the possibility of deflating the dough when it's transferred from the bowl to the sheet pan, why not just put the dough in the sheet pan for the entire rise?

Lynn C.

Hi Mary -

It will be really difficult to tell if the dough has risen and fallen if it's in a 9x13 baking dish. A bowl or, better, a narrow and tall proofing bucket will give you a better visual of how much the dough has risen.

Best,
The Milk Street Team

Jacqueline S.

Made this without olives because hubby does not like them. It as unbelievably good. Thanks for a great recipe!


Down arrow

Tomato-Olive Focaccia

Get Ready to Cook

12

Servings

7¼ hours

40 minutes active, plus cooling

Tip

Don't disturb the dough during its rise. And when transferring the dough to the baking pan, handle it gently. The goal is to retain as much gas in the dough as possible so the focaccia bakes up with an airy texture. Don't use a baking dish made of glass or ceramic; neither will produce a crisp, browned exterior, and glass is not safe to use in a 500°F oven.

Ingredients
  • 500

    grams (3⅔ cups) bread flour

  • 5

    teaspoons instant yeast

  • 1

    teaspoon white sugar

  • 2

    cups water, cool room temperature

  • 8

    tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided

  • 1 ¾

    teaspoons table salt, divided

  • 1

    cup cherry tomatoes, halved

  • 1

    cup Castelvetrano olives, pitted and halved (see note)

  • 1

    teaspoon dried oregano

  • ¾

    teaspoon ground black pepper

Step 1 of 6

Mix Dough

500
grams (3⅔ cups) bread flour
5
teaspoons instant yeast
1
teaspoon white sugar
2
cups water, cool room temperature
2
tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

In a stand mixer with the dough hook, mix the flour, yeast and sugar on medium until combined, about 30 seconds.


With the mixer on low, drizzle in the water, then increase to medium and mix until the ingredients form a very wet, smooth dough, about 5 minutes.


Turn off the mixer, cover the bowl and let stand for 10 minutes. Meanwhile, coat the bottom and sides of a large bowl with 2 tablespoons of oil; set aside.

Step 2 of 6

Rest Dough

1
teaspoon table salt

Sprinkle 1 teaspoon of salt over the dough, then knead on medium until smooth and elastic, about 5 minutes; the dough will be wet enough to cling to the sides of the bowl.


Using a silicone spatula, scrape the dough into the oiled bowl. Dip your fingers into the oil pooled at the sides of the bowl and dab the surface of the dough until completely coated with oil.


Cover loosely with plastic wrap and let stand at room temperature for 5½ to 6 hours; during this time, the dough will double in volume, deflate, then rise again (but will not double in volume again).

Step 3 of 6

Prepare Oven

2
tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

After the dough has risen for about 4½ hours, heat the oven to 500°F with a baking steel or stone on the middle rack.


Mist a 9-by-13-inch metal baking pan with cooking spray, then pour the remaining 2 tablespoons oil in the center of the pan; set aside.

Step 4 of 6

Prepare Pan

When the dough is ready, gently pour it into the prepared pan, scraping the sides of the bowl with a silicone spatula to loosen; try to retain as much air in the dough as possible.


The dough will eventually settle into an even layer in the pan; do not spread the dough with a spatula, as this will cause it to deflate. Set aside while you prepare the tomatoes.

Step 5 of 6

Add Tomatoes and Olives

1
cup cherry tomatoes, halved
1
cup Castelvetrano olives, pitted and halved

In a medium bowl, use a potato masher to lightly crush the tomatoes. Scatter the olives evenly over the dough, then do the same with the tomatoes, leaving the juice and seeds in the bowl.


If the dough has not fully filled the corners of the pan, use your hands to lightly press the tomatoes to push the dough into the corners. Let stand uncovered at room temperature for 20 minutes.

Step 6 of 6

Bake and Serve

4
tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1
teaspoon dried oregano
¾
teaspoon table salt
¾
teaspoon ground black pepper

Drizzle the dough with the remaining 4 tablespoons oil, making sure each tomato is coated. Sprinkle evenly with the oregano, remaining ¾ teaspoon salt and the pepper.


Place the pan on the baking steel or stone and bake until golden brown and the sides of the focaccia have pulled away from the pan, 20 to 22 minutes. Cool in the pan on a wire rack for 5 minutes


Using a wide metal spatula, lift the focaccia from the pan and slide it onto the rack. Cool for at least 30 minutes before serving.

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