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Milk Street Bowtie Yogurt-Roasted Carrots with Warm Spices

Yogurt-Roasted Carrots with Warm Spices

4 Servings

45 minutes

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Garam masala is an Indian blend of a number of different warm, sweet spices, including cinnamon, cardamom and cloves, plus savory ones such as cumin and black pepper. Here we supplement garam masala with crushed fennel seeds and ground turmeric to create a perfect flavor match for the earthy sweetness of carrots. Inspired by the method used to make tandoori chicken, we toss the carrots with yogurt and spices before roasting. After roasting, they’re finished with a spiced butter flavored with alliums and chopped fresh herbs.

4

Servings

Tip

Don’t forget to coat the baking sheet with cooking spray. The yogurt-covered carrots otherwise will char and stick to the pan. Don’t use large carrots for this recipe. Bunched carrots with tops are thinner and more tender than bagged carrots.

45 minutes

2 teaspoons garam masala
1 teaspoon fennel seeds, lightly crushed
1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric
Kosher salt and ground black pepper
1/4 cup whole-milk Greek yogurt
2 bunches carrots with tops (1 pound total), tops removed and discarded, halved crosswise on a sharp diagonal
4 tablespoons salted butter
1 small shallot, finely chopped
1 medium garlic clove, finely grated
1/3 cup lightly packed fresh cilantro, chopped
1/3 cup lightly packed fresh mint, chopped
Ingredients
  • 2

    teaspoons garam masala

  • 1

    teaspoon fennel seeds, lightly crushed

  • ½

    teaspoon ground turmeric

  • Kosher salt and ground black pepper

  • ¼

    cup whole-milk Greek yogurt

  • 2

    bunches carrots with tops (1 pound total), tops removed and discarded, halved crosswise on a sharp diagonal

  • 4

    tablespoons salted butter

  • 1

    small shallot, finely chopped

  • 1

    medium garlic clove, finely grated

  • cup lightly packed fresh cilantro, chopped

  • cup lightly packed fresh mint, chopped

Directions

Yogurt-Roasted Carrots with Warm Spices

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Reviews
Christopher M.

The directions talk about using 4 tsp of the spice mix in the yogurt and the remainder in the shallots, but there are only 4 tsp total of the spice mix. Should there be more spice altogether, or should less be used in the yogurt? (I'm going to double the spices and see how that works)

Lynn C.

Hi Christopher -

There is 2 teaspoons of garam masala, 1 teaspoon of whole fennel seeds, 1/2 teaspoon turmeric and 1/2 teaspoon each of salt and pepper. Before crushing the fennel seeds that would yield 4 1/2 teaspoons. After crushing the seeds the volume increases a bit so you will end up with around an extra teaspoon of spice mixture after removing the 4 teaspoons. Hope that helps!

Best,
The Milk Street Team

Stacey P M.

Would using fat free Greek yogurt work?

Lynn C.

Hi Stacey -

We didn’t test this with fat-free yogurt, but it should still work. However, keep in mind that fat-free yogurt usually contains less sugar than whole milk yogurt so you may not get as much char.

Best,
The Milk Street Team

Robert W.

I know the recipe calls for bunched carrots with tops, not large carrots, but the stores in the area only have large carrots. Even those with tops they have are on the order of a foot long and an 1.25-1.5 inches in diameter. Has anyone tried this recipe with larger carrots, but quartering them to get more into the 1/2 size range to keep the cooking time somewhat similar? Any hope this would work?

Lynn C.

Hi Robert -

The key here is to make sure the carrots are on the thinner side. If you can only find large, thick, bagged carrots we would recommend cutting them lengthwise in thinner pieces to ensure they cook through without getting too charred.

Best,
The Milk Street Team

Shirley P.

Hubby doesn't like fennel or mint, I am one of those genetically unfortunate people who can't abide cilantro. Any suggestions for substitutes? Usually I just skip fennel, and when something calls for cilantro, I use Italian parsley. When a savory recipe seems to actually need mint, I just avoid the recipe (Does this recipe really need mint? I can't imagine the taste of mint and carrot together and it seems as though mint would overpower the other herbs).
Other than the unliked herbage, this sounds like a great switch from plain carrots.