Join! 12 weeks for $1

Milk Street Bowtie Colima-Style Shredded Braised Pork

Colima-Style Shredded Braised Pork

8 Servings

5¾ hours 40 minutes active

Made This Recipe? Write a Review.
Thank you for submitting your review! A member of our team is confirming the review meets our site's Community Guidelines. It will be posted on the site shortly.
Free

The state of Colima on the western coast of Mexico is home to the pork dish called tatemado de Colima. Dried chilies, spices and aromatics, all blended to a smooth puree, are key flavorings, but a defining ingredient, other than the pork itself, is vinegar. In her version, recipe writer Paola Briseño-González uses a generous amount of smooth-tasting, subtly sweet coconut vinegar, a common ingredient in the coconut-producing region of Colima, and after slow-cooking the pork, she shreds the meat and mixes it with the braising liquid. The flavors are rich and porky but deliciously balanced by the tangy vinegar and fresh ginger, whose sharpness disappears into the mix. We adapted González’s recipe, and in doing so, found widely available rice vinegar to be a decent alternative to coconut vinegar. Traditionally, the pork is marinated, but we shortened this step to the time it takes the oven to heat (we braise in the oven, where the heat is steady and all-encompassing); we find that no taste is lost without a long marination, as the meat does a fine job of soaking up the seasonings after it is shredded. The meat is briefly broiled after braising to develop deep browning, so you will need a broiler-safe Dutch oven for this recipe. Serve the shredded pork with rice and beans, or make tacos with it, offering shredded cabbage, chopped onion and lime wedges alongside.

8

Servings

Tip

Don’t use an uncoated cast-iron Dutch oven, even if it is well seasoned. The acidity of the vinegar may react with the metal, resulting in a tinny, “off” flavor. However, an enamel-coated Dutch oven is fine.

5¾ hours

40 minutes active

4 large (1¼ ounces) guajillo chilies, stemmed and seeded
5-7 pound bone-in pork butt or pork shoulder roast
2 cups coconut vinegar or unseasoned rice vinegar
1 cup coconut milk
1/3 cup roughly chopped peeled fresh ginger
9 medium garlic cloves, smashed and peeled
3 bay leaves
1 tablespoon tomato paste
1/2 teaspoon coriander seeds
1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds
1/2 teaspoon white sugar
Kosher salt and ground black pepper
Ingredients
  • 4

    large (1¼ ounces) guajillo chilies, stemmed and seeded

  • 5-7

    pound bone-in pork butt or pork shoulder roast

  • 2

    cups coconut vinegar or unseasoned rice vinegar

  • 1

    cup coconut milk

  • cup roughly chopped peeled fresh ginger

  • 9

    medium garlic cloves, smashed and peeled

  • 3

    bay leaves

  • 1

    tablespoon tomato paste

  • ½
  • ½

    teaspoon cumin seeds

  • ½

    teaspoon white sugar

  • Kosher salt and ground black pepper

Directions

Colima-Style Shredded Braised Pork

Shop the Milk Street Store
More
Reviews
William G.
November 2, 2022
Everyone Loved this
The coconut vinegar should be ordered online, but cider vinegar works just as well. I forgot to broil it at the end, but it was still crispy and delicious.
Diana L.

I made this today. It was very good. My kid even so that it was his favorite dish and that Milk Streets dishes are so good. About the recipe: I could not find chilies, so I have used 2 med size red peppers. The sauce came out sour. It was "Not able to eat sour" but good sour taste. So, to balance the flavor, we have added Amy's organic Bakes Beans to tortillas when serving. These beans are sweet. We have also added avocados and tomatoes to tortillas. It's turned out pretty good.

Sean K.

Pungent, flavorful, enticing, and delicious: this "tatemado de Colima" makes for a huge batch of succulent, juicy meat perfect on its own with a fork—or on top of some crispy tortillas, tostada style. I followed the recipe precisely, even sourcing actual coconut vinegar which to me was closer to a woody, sherry-like vinegar than the rice vinegar suggested as a possible substitute. Coriander seeds gave a delicate floral note to the meat, while cumin gave a tobacco-like backbone. Four gaujillo chiles maybe were too few, in fact! But I rather enjoy an up-front chile flavor.

The only drawback to this dish: goodness does it stink up your house! The coconut vinegar's aroma is not unpleasant—and indeed in many ways it's almost "bready"—but it's *strong*. Five hours of coconut vinegar gently bubbling away in the oven was enough to make my house reek for three–four days or so. As much as I liked the end results, I don't think I'll ever cook this indoors again. Dutch oven? Meet the outdoor grill!