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Milk Street Recipe
Cookish
Milk Street Bowtie Beef Stew with Olives and Orange

Beef Stew with Olives and Orange

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3½ hours 30 minutes active

Beef Stew with Olives and Orange

6 Servings

This unconventional, but easy beef-stew method yields deep. We skip the step of browning the meat, add a only minimal amount of liquid (sometimes none at all) and use the steady heat of the oven instead of the stovetop for simmering. Because the ingredients cook gently in their own juices, the finished stew is meaty and concentrated in flavor, and the liquid does not require thickening. This Provençal-inspired braise combines savory olives and sweet oranges. A Y-style vegetable peeler is the best tool for removing the zest strips from the orange. Serve with crusty bread or soft polenta.

6

Servings

3½ hours

30 minutes active

4-5 pounds boneless beef chuck roast, trimmed and cut into 1½-inch chunks
2 medium red onions, ends trimmed, each cut into 8 wedges
1 cup pitted Kalamata olives, roughly chopped
Zest strips from 1 orange (see note), plus ⅓ cup orange juice
2 teaspoons dried oregano OR herbes de Provence
Kosher salt and ground black pepper
½ cup dry white wine
Optional garnish: Chopped fresh basil OR flat-leaf parsley
Ingredients
  • 4-5

    pounds boneless beef chuck roast, trimmed and cut into 1½-inch chunks

  • 2

    medium red onions, ends trimmed, each cut into 8 wedges

  • 1

    cup pitted Kalamata olives, roughly chopped

  • Zest strips from 1 orange (see note), plus ⅓ cup orange juice

  • 2

    teaspoons dried oregano OR herbes de Provence

  • Kosher salt and ground black pepper

  • ½

    cup dry white wine

  • Optional garnish: Chopped fresh basil OR flat-leaf parsley

Directions
Reviews
John K.

The directions here differ a little from those of the TV version. Is it better to reserve the juices after roasting the beef, reduce the wine, add them back into the pot... or is it better the way it's described here???

Lynn C.

Hi John -

This version is from our cookbook, Cookish. Cookish is a fresh take on fast food at home. Six ingredients. Minutes, not hours. Fresh, bold flavors for any night of the week. The version from the TV show is the more "authentic" version, which calls for 2 1/2 cups of red wine. Since that version includes a significant amount of wine it requires the more extensive instructions since we don't want to add that much wine at the beginning of cooking. The long cooking time will dull its flavor and negatively impact the flavor of the meat. For this Cookish version, we only use 1/2 cup of white wine and only add it after the first 2 hours of cooking. In this case, the wine is added after the cover is removed so it reduces far before it's flavor is affected or has a chance to affect the flavor of the meat. Either version is great, but the TV version, which you can find here - https://www.177milkstreet.com/recipes/boeuf-gardiane - has a bit more complexity and nuanced flavor. Hope that clears it up!

Best,
The Milk Street Team

Ryan B.

ZEST STRIPS FROM 1 ORANGE (SEE NOTE) - Am I missing the note?

Lynn C.

Hi Ryan -

The note about the orange zest is in the headnote at the beginning of the recipe. It reads, "A Y-style vegetable peeler is the best tool for removing the zest strips from the orange."

Best,
The Milk Street Team