globe outlook-b

Join! 12 weeks for $1

The New Milk Street Cookbook | Order + Save 40%!

TVCB 4 Spine Mock

EVERY RECIPE FROM THE FIRST 4 SEASONS

Christopher Kimball’s Milk Street | Milk Street Faces

Christopher Kimball’s Milk Street | Milk Street Faces

The stories of the people who feed us
  • Hussein Castillo, Garifuna Flava, Chicago, Illinois

    “A lot of businesses went under, every single one on our block except ours. In... read more
    “A lot of businesses went under, every single one on our block except ours. In black and brown communities, we get hit hardest and take longest to recover,” says Hussein Castillo, co-owner of Garifuna Flava, a Chicago restaurant that opened just before the 2008 recession. Garifuna cuisine is a product of the mixture of West African slaves and Arawak Indians who were exiled from British and French Caribbean islands and settled in coastal Central America in the 1700s. Castillo understands the frustration that triggered the protests, though he doesn’t condone the rioters. “Clearly, a vast majority of people were protesting things that hadn’t been handled for a very long time, maybe ever. At some point, things were going to boil over. I was speaking to some elders in the community about the ’68 Democratic Convention here and it was something similar. Each situation of injustice created protest, but through the years it’s building and building and building, and this last situation just exploded. When one aspect of society has people that aren’t treated justly or fairy, eventually we’re all going to feel the affects.” — Hussein Castillo, Garifuna Flava, Chicago, Illinois, as told to Albert Stumm. ... less
  • Sharon Richardson, Just Soul Catering and Reentry Rocks, New York City

    “Life is on its head right now. There’s so much happening all at once that... read more
    “Life is on its head right now. There’s so much happening all at once that it does make your heart feel heavy and the tears constantly run down your face,” says Sharon Richardson, executive director and CEO of Just Soul Catering, which hires only formerly incarcerated women, and Rentry Rocks, her nonprofit for the same population. “I’m a formerly incarcerated woman. I spent 20 years inside for a domestic violence case. I love cooking and I love people and I often say, you put those two things together and you get my catering company.” COVID-19 derailed her work, so instead she has focused on providing free meals for people in need. “We’ve fed Mount Sinai, New York Presbyterian, kids of essential workers, East New York and Brownsville community centers… You want to do so much, but being on the front lines means that you’re in a place where your life can be taken from you. And for us, as formerly incarcerated women, our lives were taken in a way that can’t be explained. Now we’re involved in a company that I created and we’re back on that front line again. But at the end of the day, it feels so rewarding to just be a part, and I think the world needs to hear that formerly incarcerated people are involved, too. We want to be honest. We want people to know we’re here. We’re present and we’re women.” Sharon Richardson, Just Soul Catering and Reentry Rocks, as told to Alison Spiegel (Photo credit: Sharon Richardson) ... less
  • Douglass Williams, Mida, Boston, Massachusetts

    “Most people don’t know, but there’s a reason Wendy’s burgers are square. It’s because Dave... read more
    “Most people don’t know, but there’s a reason Wendy’s burgers are square. It’s because Dave Thomas doesn’t cut corners,” Douglass Williams, chef/owner of Boston’s award-winning Italian restaurant Mida, says of lessons learned at his first job. “It’s symbolism. That taught me that what you stand for can translate into the food in many different ways. And it stuck with me. I’ll never forget that,” says Williams, who was just named one of Food & Wine’s Best New Chefs. “So for the last 20 years, working in Paris at the best restaurant in the world, working in New York at another best restaurant in the world, I’ve been trying to hold onto those values and bring that to Mida.” Williams’ values speak for themselves in his food and also in his team. “My staff, who’s made up of every culture—Irish, Dominican, Colombian, Jewish—they came to me with this sign [that says ‘Proud to be a Black Owned Business'], and they said, ‘Chef, this is what we did,’ and they put it up. I didn’t tell them to. But right now, in this time, it was great timing on their part. And people are going nuts over it in the best way. I couldn’t be more proud of them for doing that.” Douglass Williams, Mida, Boston, as told to Alison Spiegel. (Photo credit: Chris Churchill) ... less
  • Ty Brown, The Bergen, Brooklyn, New York

    “When we shout, ‘No justice, no peace,’ what you’re seeing today is the no peace... read more
    “When we shout, ‘No justice, no peace,’ what you’re seeing today is the no peace part of that mantra. Because there’s been plenty of examples of no justice,” says Ty Brown, owner of The Bergen, a wings-and-burgers takeout spot in Crown Heights, Brooklyn. A lifelong activist, Brown became a youth organizer for the Rev. Al Sharpton at age 15 and later ran youth centers. Just weeks after opening The Bergen, the pandemic shut him down. “Covid changed a lot of stuff. But troubleshooting is my thing. Whatever it is, I’ll figure it out. Right away, we started a free lunch program (for the community). We did lunch bags with peanut butter jelly sandwiches, turkey sandwiches, chips and juice.” A few weeks later, he was diagnosed with COVID-19, but the free meals continued, even while he was hospitalized. Now recovered, his mind is on the protests. “This is what you get,” he says. “Police brutality, police misconduct is out of control. It’s out of control against one particular race of people. It’s out of control and it goes untouched and untalked about. Our new direction has to be toward lawmakers.” And he’s been urging people to use tools like ballotpedia.org to learn who represents them. “This is how we can move from rioting and talking to action.” Ty Brown, The Bergen as told to Alison Spiegel. (Photo credit: Renita Leonce) ... less
  • Luis “Beto” Robledo, Cuantos Tacos, Austin, Texas

    “I saw people going to drive-thru restaurants like McDonald’s and other chains because it’s feasible... read more
    “I saw people going to drive-thru restaurants like McDonald’s and other chains because it’s feasible to serve people with very little contact,” says Luis “Beto” Robledo, chef and owner of Cuantos Tacos food truck in Austin, Texas. He closed for a week in late March, but knew immediately that wouldn’t last. “I realized I wouldn’t be able to survive this. This is my only income and I have a wife and daughter.” So Beto reopened with a new feature for his truck—a drive-thru window. “I already had a little roof extending out from my trailer and, after clearing away chairs and tables, extra space for cars to drive up. So I covered the front, where the roof ends, with clear plastic roofing and turned it into a drive-thru window.” Luis “Beto” Robledo, chef and owner of Cuantos Tacos, Austin, Texas, as told to Alison Spiegel (Photo by Taylor Elliot).Looking for ways to help? We support the work of World Central Kitchen. ... less
  • Maiko Kyogoku, Bessou, New York City

    “This is the death of what was,” says Maiko Kyogoku, owner of Bessou in the... read more
    “This is the death of what was,” says Maiko Kyogoku, owner of Bessou in the NoHo neighborhood of New York City. “The economics have always been based on really slim margins, but it depends on factors like packing in a small space, cramming tables in, making sure to turn the dining room at least one and a half times. That’s not going to happen for a while.” She initially planned to reopen for takeout after the first two weeks of quarantine, but her workers weren’t willing to come back. “It’s a combo of fear about catching the virus but also right now in New York at least, the unemployment is a really good payment plan. Everyone is getting $600 a week on top of whatever they claimed, so they’re making more than what they were before. That’s something not really discussed. … I can’t incentivize workers to come back unless I can match the unemployment.” — Maiko Kyogoku, Bessou, New York City, as told to Albert Stumm (Photo by Melissa Hom).Looking for ways to help? We support the work of World Central Kitchen.
    ... less
  • Vivian Howard, Handy & Hot and Benny's Big Time Pizzaria, North Carolina

    “Our entire business model is based on communal eating and hospitality—putting your hand on someone’s... read more
    “Our entire business model is based on communal eating and hospitality—putting your hand on someone’s back and ushering them to their table or pouring a bottle of wine,” says Vivian Howard, North Carolina chef and restaurant owner, and star of “A Chef’s Life” and “Somewhere South.” “If we reopen and we’re at 30 percent capacity, whether it’s because of Covid guidelines or because of the economy, there’s not enough revenue or tips,” she says. “What I don't want to happen is all of us go away and what emerges are just more big box chains. In so many situations, mom and pop restaurants are the backbone of the community, and we may not realize it right now, but they will be missed.” — Vivian Howard, chef-owner of Benny's Big Time Pizzeria, Wilmington, North Carolina and Handy and Hot online store, currently operating out of Chef & the Farmer, Kinston, North Carolina, as told to Alison Spiegel (Photo by Baxter Miller).Looking for ways to help? We support the work of World Central Kitchen.
    ... less
  • David Ayotte, The Fenn School, Concord, Massachusetts

    “This is what all those science fiction writers write about all the time,” says David... read more
    “This is what all those science fiction writers write about all the time,” says David Ayotte, kitchen manager at The Fenn School, an all-boys private middle school in Concord, Massachusetts. And it leaves him wondering how his world has any chance of returning to normal. Before this, he and his four staff members prepared from-scratch lunches daily for 400 students. Now they are furloughed, waiting for unemployment to kick in. “I’m concerned about what, after this, the market is going to look like. We have a full salad and deli bar and everything is just out there under sneeze guard. Is everything now going to be, I have to package everything? Am I going to spend an extra 15, 20 percent on paper goods so it can’t be grabbed by bunch of kids with dirty hands? I see 133 boys at the biggest lunch and (they) sit right next to each other, is that going to change? All these dynamics, what’s going to change?” Ayotte’s employer is a massive food services company with more than 200,000 workers across the country. “Nobody knows what this is going to look like when it’s over. I’m a small account, but if it’s just prepackaged, kind of Pret a Manger style, they don’t need those extra people. We’ll just have cleaners and set up, and that cuts catering in half.” — David Ayotte, The Fenn School, Concord, Massachusetts, as told to Albert Stumm (Photo by David Ayotte).Looking for ways to help? We support the work of World Central Kitchen.
    ... less
  • Alexis Katsilometes, Nopalito, San Francisco, California

    “Having a purpose every day is so important to us. We needed to keep going... read more
    “Having a purpose every day is so important to us. We needed to keep going for our staff—our family,” says Alexis Katsilometes, director of operations at San Francisco’s Nopalito restaurant, which is open for takeout, selling meal kits in stores around the city and feeding hospital workers. “There’s a roller coaster of emotions. But I think that for a lot of us, having to-go and delivery has given a sense of stability,” she says. “I’ve never experienced the feeling of family and community like I have at Nopalito. Though it’s really strange to be around these people that I love so deeply and not be able to get close to them. At the same time, it really bonds people even closer.” Alexis Katsilometes, Nopalito, San Francisco, as told to Alison Spiegel (Photo credit: Kyra Kryder).Looking for ways to help? We support the work of World Central Kitchen.
    ... less
  • Gretchen Thomas, Threes Brewing, Brooklyn, New York

    “It’s a weird system we developed, but people are getting their beer,” says Gretchen Thomas... read more
    “It’s a weird system we developed, but people are getting their beer,” says Gretchen Thomas, the events manager of Threes Brewing in Brooklyn, New York. When the brewpubs were forced to close down, Thomas searched for a way to keep her staff tending bar. And they are, albeit from the safety of their vehicles. “Our customers wanted to support us, but since they’re not really supposed to leave home, we hired back some of the bartenders, backwaiters and kitchen staff who have cars and sent them out with deliveries,” she said. “It’s all done with gloves and masks, and we’re leaving things on people’s stoops so we’re checking IDs from 6 feet away. Most bartenders when they’re checking an ID, it’s dark in a bar, so they have their ways to do that in challenging situations. A lot of them have been grateful for the opportunity to keep working and keep busy. … We hospitality people can’t deal with not having something to do. There’s not enough Netflix in the world.” — Gretchen Thomas, Threes Brewing, Brooklyn, New York, as told to Albert Stumm (Photo by Tobias Prasse)
    Looking for ways to help? We support the work of World Central Kitchen.
    ... less
  • Heidi Barr, The Kitchen Garden Series, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

    “Masks equal the new lipstick,” says Heidi Barr, who until recently made her living supplying... read more
    “Masks equal the new lipstick,” says Heidi Barr, who until recently made her living supplying restaurants with high-end aprons, napkins and towels made from natural fibers and salvaged fabrics. Like so many, last month she was forced to pivot. “So I make masks. I know how to sew and am sitting on a pile of fabric, but sewing is not keeping me sane. I was transitioning out of being a stitcher, but the shop I was working with has shuttered as non-essential. I’m totally a mask factory these days. It’s weird and kind of awful. It’s exhausting. It’s very distracting from my real business, so I have hired someone to help with masks and will likely be posting them on my website. Masks are going to be with us for some time. I have very complicated feelings about that, but survival is good. I am offering them for a sliding scale of $0 to $15, the $15 covers those $0.” — Heidi Barr, The Kitchen Garden Series, Philadelphia, as told to Ari Mille (Photo by @thekitchengardenseries)Looking for ways to help? We support the work of World Central Kitchen.
    ... less
  • Amelia Eesley, Amelia’s Wood Fired Cuisine and Amelia’s Market & Brasserie​, Tulsa, Oklahoma

    “This is going to change us,” says Amelia Eesley, owner of Amelia's Wood Fired Cuisine... read more
    “This is going to change us,” says Amelia Eesley, owner of Amelia's Wood Fired Cuisine and Amelia's Market & Brasserie, in Tulsa, Oklahoma. “What will happen if the industry does not rebound? A lot of people order food and wine, and you have educated yourself on this, so what happens next if it doesn’t come back? I think it is a question that we are all asking ourselves right now.” Eesley was forced to let go 75 employees. The 10 who remain focus on takeout. She focuses on a future that's difficult to plan for. “Is anybody going to come and eat after this is over? Am I going to have to space my tables out really far away? What is going to happen to my staff? I don’t know. What we want to do is to survive and if I was going to say something to future diners, when we are able to step back into our kitchen and invite them back into our dining rooms, their presence will mean more than anything.” — Amelia Eesley, Amelia’s Wood Fired Cuisine and Amelia’s Market & Brasserie, Tulsa, Oklahoma, as told to Halle Frieden (Photo by Halle Frieden). Looking for ways to help? We support the work of World Central Kitchen.
    ... less
  • Karl Prohaska, Zottola’s Pub and Eatery, Culmerville, Pennsylvania

    “Anyone that’s still open, we’re now competing against each other when generally we didn’t before,”... read more
    “Anyone that’s still open, we’re now competing against each other when generally we didn’t before,” says Karl Prohaska, chef of the Zottola’s Pub and Eatery, an Italian gastropub in Culmerville, Pennsylvania. The mandate that restaurants offer only takeout means that many of the factors that once set eateries apart from one another have been eliminated. “Suddenly, hand tossed, gourmet pizzas are getting put up against $6 pizzas from Papa John’s. This is not the same thing. What were designed for is to have a couple cocktails, see your neighbors, see your bartender, then get that pizza. (We’re) not designed for, ‘Here’s your box of pizza, now go home.’” Prohaska, who moonlights as a comedian, and his sous chef are the only ones working since they switched to takeout-only, focusing on family-style dishes that travel well, like lasagna, chicken parmesan and meatloaf. Sales are about a quarter of normal. Still, he considers himself lucky to still be working. “I’ve turned into a golden retriever. When I ride in a car, I get really excited.” — Karl Prohaska, Zottola’s Pub and Eatery, Culmerville, Pennsylvania, as told to Albert Stumm (Photo by Annette Prohaska).Looking for ways to help? We support the work of World Central Kitchen.
    ... less
  • Roberto Santibanez, Fonda, New York City

    “The unknown is so terrible. I was talking to friend of mine about what we... read more
    “The unknown is so terrible. I was talking to friend of mine about what we went through during the AIDS crisis when we were very young and it was horrific. I lost most of my friends in that time, but life didn’t stop. It was a humongous crisis, it was brutal and terrifying, but life never stopped. That’s what makes this so incredibly different. This stop has been crazy,” says Roberto Santibanez, owner of three Fonda restaurants in New York City and two other eateries in Washington. “I have to to say, this has gotten to me pretty badly.” He’s had to scale back from about 300 employees to fewer than 30, and revenue from takeout and delivery is about 10 percent of normal. “Some days I feel better than others, but overall I feel in a funk, which is where we all are." His company managed to pay rent on all his locations for half of April, and they’re applying for federal assistance. “But are people going to be confident to come to a restaurant and sit down? How long is that going to take? Really, I don’t know. It’s so complicated.” — Roberto Santibanez, Fonda, New York City, as told to Albert Stumm (Photo by Sam Horine).Looking for ways to help? We support the work of World Central Kitchen.
    ... less
  • Molly Mitchell, Roses Find Foods, Detroit, Michigan

    “It feels good to still feel useful,” says Molly Mitchell, chef/owner of Roses Fine Foods... read more
    “It feels good to still feel useful,” says Molly Mitchell, chef/owner of Roses Fine Foods in Detroit, a diner that was forced to shut down March 16, laying off 11 workers. After that, she became one of six area restaurants who banded together to feed ER staff at nearby Henry Ford Medical Center. “I have this big commercial kitchen, so it feels good to fit into some kind of niche. You gotta stay busy somehow.” She’s mostly making family-style meals—pasta or chicken stew with slaw and roast potatoes, plus frittatas, focaccia sandwiches and doughnuts. “I’m a one-woman restaurant right now. Every day I’m like, ‘Oh, god!’ … It’s surreal pulling up there because they have the testing center, and they’re fully suited up with the welder shield masks and hazmat suits. I pull up and they bring a wheelchair out, stack the food on the chair and take it inside.” — Molly Mitchell, chef/owner of Roses Fine Foods, Detroit, Michigan, as told to Albert Stumm (Photo by Roses Fine Food) Looking for ways to help? We support the work of World Central Kitchen. ... less
  • Ismael de Sousa, Reunion Bread, Denver, Colorado

    “It broke my heart to see so many people getting laid off,” says Ismael de... read more
    “It broke my heart to see so many people getting laid off,” says Ismael de Sousa, owner of the year-old Reunion Bread shop inside The Source market hall in Denver, Colorado. “Two days after this all started, 90 percent of staff that used to work at this market got laid off. So I thought, how can we help these guys? There wasn’t any other way other than to give them food, or sell it at a super discounted rate. I called a produce vendor and put some boxes together with loaves of bread for really cheap. Many restaurant owners were buying boxes for their own people. That’s how the idea started. Then as things started getting worse, with people being scared of going to the store, we started getting an insane amount of requests. At end of the day we want to help everyone. … I don’t make any money from the boxes, by the way. I do it to keep the staff busy. I’m probably the only one in the hall that hasn’t laid anyone off. My people aren’t making the same hours, but I managed to keep all the staff. So far.” — Ismael de Sousa, Reunion Bread, Denver, Colorado, as told to Albert Stumm (Photo by Alden Bonecutter).Looking for ways to help? We support the work of World Central Kitchen.
    ... less
  • Cindy Kruse, Cindy Lou’s Cookies​, Miami, Florida

    “For us, it’s just cookies. But for them, it means so much,” says Cindy Kruse... read more
    “For us, it’s just cookies. But for them, it means so much,” says Cindy Kruse, owner of Cindy Lou’s Cookies, a Miami bakery that—with little other business—has been donating boxes of oversized treats to workers at hospitals across the city. “Our main source of income is pretty much zero. (But) everyone is still working. The full timers went to part time. People are still coming into the shop for their comfort food ... And that’s why we started doing the hospital thing. We didn’t want to close and we wanted to do something for the hospitals. Now people are calling us to donate money for us to bake and take cookies to hospitals,” she said, a movement that spurred a new hashtag — #cookiesforacause. “It actually makes me feel really lucky to be able to do this. In my eyes, they are the real heroes, yet they are thanking us.” — Cindy Kruse, Cindy Lou’s Cookies, Miami, as told to Suzette Laboy (Photo by Suzette Laboy). Looking for ways to help? We support the work of World Central Kitchen
    ... less
  • Dan Corcoran, The Inn at Woodloch, Hawley, Pennsylvania

    “It’s just a totally eerie feeling,” says Dan Corcoran, executive chef at The Inn at... read more
    “It’s just a totally eerie feeling,” says Dan Corcoran, executive chef at The Inn at Woodloch, a family-run lakefront resort in Pennsylvania’s Pocono Mountains. “Every day, I begin my drive down the road; it’s quiet. I’m shaking my head, like, ‘I can’t believe what’s going on here.’ And then I get to the resort, and the parking lots are empty.” Staff has been furloughed during one of the busiest seasons for the resort, which opened in 1958. Corcoran and several other staff remain working part-time to fill the resort’s shop, which provides food to some locals and permanent residents. But that couldn’t make use of all the food left behind when Woodloch closed last month. Some went to food pantries, some to employees when they came to collect their last checks. “I think there was about 400 bags that went out to staff,” says Corcoran. “There’s a lot of uncertainty … I’m sure once we get the word that they’re going to reopen, then everybody will come together, and it’ll be a great sight. We just have to hang in there, like everybody else in the world.” — Dan Corcoran, The Inn at Woodloch, Hawley, Pennsylvania, as told to Sile Ni Fhloinn (Photo by Woodloch Resort)Looking for ways to help? We support the work of World Central Kitchen. ... less
  • J. Kenji López-Alt​​, Wursthall, ​San Mateo, CA

    “We’re actually stopping [takeout and delivery] service, because at this point, it just feels irresponsible... read more
    “We’re actually stopping [takeout and delivery] service, because at this point, it just feels irresponsible. We have two people on the line. There’s plenty of space for them. But when things start to get really busy, they end up walking past each other frequently,” says J. Kenji Lopez-Alt, food writer and chef at San Mateo, California-based Wursthall. “I don’t understand why restaurants are considered essential. What ends up happening is you’re placing the responsibility on the owner to make sure their employees are safe, but also to say, ‘Hey. Now’s the time to stop.’ It’s a difficult decision because you don’t want to put your employees at risk, and that’s the main thing I’m thinking about. But if you shut down the restaurant, then your employees don’t have an income stream. So we’re going to continue our donation-based free meal service that we’re doing with local hospitals. They’re boxed, delivered meals, so there’s no lunch rush or dinner rush. From a safety standpoint, it’s sort of a no-brainer. We’ve partnered with @offtheirplate, a sub organization of World Central Kitchen. I would also encourage people to call up their favorite restaurant and ask how to help, because the local places are the ones that are going to get hit hard by all this.” J. Kenji López-Alt, Wurstahll, San Mateo, CA, as told to @alison_spiegel (Photo by J. Kenji López-Alt) Looking for ways to help? We support the work of World Central Kitchen.
    ... less
  • Jennifer Caraway, Joy Bus, Phoenix, Arizona

    “My heart is breaking,” says Jennifer Caraway, founder and executive director of Phoenix-area charity Joy... read more
    “My heart is breaking,” says Jennifer Caraway, founder and executive director of Phoenix-area charity Joy Bus, which delivers chef-inspired meals to homebound cancer patients. “It’s hugely impacted us.” The social interaction always was as important as the food during deliveries, but that’s no longer safe. “They’re not allowed to be there when the patient opens the door. They have zero contact with the patient.” Caraway also runs the Joy Bus Diner, an eatery whose profits go solely toward the effort. The diner has switched to takeout but it, too, has been hobbled by social distancing. “We are the only place you can go and, every single time, [people] are either laughing or crying about their diagnoses. ... To take that away from our neighborhood and stick a table in front of the door so they’re no longer able to come inside, and we can’t touch them, we can’t help them... It completely changes our mission. We’re part of a community; we created this community and now they can’t feel like they’re a part of it.” Still, that community hasn’t forgotten the diner’s mission. “On the positive side, people that would come every day and have bacon and eggs are driving by and dropping off a check of what they would’ve spent if they could’ve come in the diner. People are really trying to support us, but I think, as the days go by, they’re more afraid to leave their homes.” — Jennifer Caraway, Joy Bus, Phoenix, as told to Sile Ni Fhloinn (Photo by Areli Trapero)Looking for ways to help? We support the work of World Central Kitchen.
    ... less
FEBRUARY 2021
STELTON 16.9 OZ JUG + THEO MILK JUG + THEO SLOW BREWER + THEO SUGAR BOWL

$235.95 VALUE

Success!

Thank you for participating in our monthly giveaway!
Entry Form
How we use your email.

Your email address is required to identify your giveaway entry as well as communications from Milk Street. We will not share or rent your email address. You can unsubscribe from receiving our emails at any time.

Enter the Milk Street Giveaway