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Milk Street Recipe
Milk Street Bowtie Pastry for Deep-Dish Quiche

Pastry for Deep-Dish Quiche

Appears in May-June 2020

2½ hours 25 minutes active

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Pastry for Deep-Dish Quiche

Free

We highly recommend using a 9-inch-round and 2-inch-deep metal tart pan with fluted sides and a removable bottom. The metal is a good conductor of heat so the crust browns nicely, even without prebaking. A deep-dish glass pie plate (such as Pyrex) will get the job done, but the crust will not brown as well.

1

9-inch-round deep-dish pastry

Tip

Don’t forget to freeze the flour-butter mixture for 10 minutes before processing. This helps the ingredients remain cold as they’re mixed so the dough is easier to handle and the crust bakes up tender. If the flour-butter mixture is in the freezer for longer than 10 minutes, the butter will be extra-firm, so the processing time will likely need to be extended.

2½ hours

25 minutes active

245 grams (1¾ cups plus 2 tablespoons) all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting
3/4 teaspoon table salt
12 tablespoons (1½ sticks) cold salted butter, cut into ½-inch cubes
5 tablespoons ice water
Ingredients
  • 245

    grams (1¾ cups plus 2 tablespoons) all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting

  • ¾

    teaspoon table salt

  • 12

    tablespoons (1½ sticks) cold salted butter, cut into ½-inch cubes

  • 5

    tablespoons ice water

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Staples

Reviews
Rajat B.

It's a great recipe. But why is 245g flour equal to 2.75c? That seem off the rails high. I understand the need for volume measurements but that's a lot of flour for a 9" pan. Also why not include weights for the water and butter? I assume this fundamentally is a 3:2:1 by weight recipe.

Janelle C.

Hi Rajat,

Here at milk street, we measure by weight not volume. We did not include weights for the water and butter as it is not typical with baking recipes.

Best,
The Milk Street Team

Jean-Pierre S.

I have to agree that there was an overage of flour. I had to add much more water than was called for in the recipe when I used the cup conversion. I never have issues with my typical Pate Brisee recipe. Moreover, it produced way more dough than was needed.

Loewi L.

It's a good suggestion and you should consider changing what you do to go with the flow, Milk Street. It is typical, actually. Look at Chefsteps. Weights for all the ingredients.

Jean-Pierre S.

I have to agree that there was an overage of flour. I had to add much more water than was called for in the recipe when I used the cup conversion. I never have issues with my typical Pate Brisee recipe. Moreover, it produced way more dough than was needed.

Loewi L.

It's a good suggestion and you should consider changing what you do to go with the flow, Milk Street. It is typical, actually. Look at Chefsteps. Weights for all the ingredients.

William H.

I haven't tried this recipe yet, so I cannot speak to the ratio of flour to butter to water, or the total quantity of the dough in relation to the size of the pan. However, for Rajat B's question: why is 245g flour equal to 2.75c? Milk Street defines 1 cup of all purpose flour as 130 grams. So, "1¾ cups plus 2 tablespoons" = 1.75 cups plus 0.125 cup = 1.875 cups. 1.875 cups x 130 grams/cup = 243.75 grams (approximately 245 grams, though 244 grams would be closer).

Rajat B.

Another truck thats worth pointing out. When you add ice to water the water in the cup is not at 0C. If you stir the water with an instant read thermometer as if you were making a cocktail you will find that after a 30s or so the water approaches 0C- now it's ice cold. You can help yourself out by putting your ice water in a thermos to keep it ice cold. Some add a little salt or alcohoo to get an even colder temp.

Tracie B.

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Diana L.

I made this dough two times now and everytime it comes out right. It tastes good as well. Thank you!

Julia K.

My first attempt at homemade pie dough - turned out great!

Scott M.

Why does it say 1.5 and then 3/4 tsp of table salt? Which one is it?

Lynn C.

Hi Scott -

Thanks for pointing this out! That is a typo. It should be 3/4 teaspoon of table salt. We recently switched our baking recipes from kosher to table salt and that 1 1/2 was left there by accident during the conversion. Hope that clears it up!

Best,
The Milk Street Team


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Pastry for Deep-Dish Quiche

Get Ready to Cook

1

9-inch-round deep-dish pastry

2½ hours

25 minutes active

Tip

Don’t forget to freeze the flour-butter mixture for 10 minutes before processing. This helps the ingredients remain cold as they’re mixed so the dough is easier to handle and the crust bakes up tender. If the flour-butter mixture is in the freezer for longer than 10 minutes, the butter will be extra-firm, so the processing time will likely need to be extended.

Ingredients
  • 245

    grams (1¾ cups plus 2 tablespoons) all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting

  • ¾

    teaspoon table salt

  • 12

    tablespoons (1½ sticks) cold salted butter, cut into ½-inch cubes

  • 5

    tablespoons ice water

Step 1 of 3

Combine Ingredients

245
grams (2¾ cups plus 2 tablespoons) all-purpose flour
¾
teaspoon table salt
12
tablespoons (1½ sticks) cold salted butter, cut into ½-inch cubes

In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour and salt. Add the butter and toss, separating any stuck-together cubes, until evenly coated. Freeze uncovered for 10 minutes.

Step 2 of 3

Add Water

5
tablespoons ice water

Transfer the chilled flour-butter mixture to a food processor. Pulse until the butter chunks are about the size of peas, 10 to 12 pulses. Add the water and process until the mixture forms clumps but does not come together in a ball, 20 to 25 seconds.

Step 3 of 3

Refrigerate Dough

Turn the dough out onto the counter and press it into a disk about 6 inches wide. Wrap tightly in plastic, smoothing out any ragged edges. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour or up to 2 days.

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Done!

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