All of our online cooking courses are now free, forever! Click here to get started.

globe outlook-b

Join! 12 weeks for $1

The Milk Street Cookbook | Save 60%!

The Milk Street Cookbook - Sillo

EVERY RECIPE FROM THE FIRST 3 SEASONS

Milk Street Recipe
Milk Street Bowtie Taiwanese Five-Spice Pork with Rice (Lu Rou Fan)

Taiwanese Five-Spice Pork with Rice (Lu Rou Fan)

40 minutes

Taiwanese Five-Spice Pork with Rice (Lu Rou Fan)

Free

This Taiwanese dish, called lu rou fan, is a one-bowl meal consisting of richly flavored, soy-simmered pork served over steamed rice. Pork belly is traditional, but we found ground pork faster and just as delicious. Hard-cooked eggs are common, but we preferred soft-cooked eggs for their runny yolks. To make soft-cooked eggs, bring 2 cups of water to a simmer in a large saucepan fitted with a steamer basket. Add eggs, cover and steam over medium for 7 minutes. Transfer the eggs to ice water to stop the cooking, then shell and halve the eggs before serving. We liked serving steamed or stir-fried bok choy or broccoli alongside, a nice balance to the richness of the pork.

1 1/2 pounds ground pork
1 cup low-sodium soy sauce, divided, plus more, as needed
1/4 cup grapeseed or other neutral oil
12 ounces shallots, halved and thinly sliced
10 medium garlic cloves, minced
1 1/4 cups dry sherry
1/3 cup packed dark brown sugar
2 tablespoons five-spice powder
1 tablespoon unseasoned rice vinegar
Steamed rice, to serve
3 scallions, thinly sliced on bias
Ingredients
  • pounds ground pork

  • 1

    cup low-sodium soy sauce, divided, plus more, as needed

  • ¼

    cup grapeseed or other neutral oil

  • 12

    ounces shallots, halved and thinly sliced

  • 10

    medium garlic cloves, minced

  • cups dry sherry

  • cup packed dark brown sugar

  • 2

    tablespoons five-spice powder

  • 1
  • Steamed rice, to serve

  • 3

    scallions, thinly sliced on bias

In the store
More

Mains

Comments
  • Layne S.

    What about using dark soy sauce instead of low sodium soy sauce? I know dark is less salty than regular light soy sauce but not sure how it compares to lower sodium soy sauces. I’d guess it’s fine mixed in the ground pork and I’ve seen it used for braising in other recipes but I don’t want to end up with a salty mess.

    0 votes
    2 comments
    • Janelle C.

      This is a great question. Would you post it in our Q&A Forum for Milk Street Insiders and Digital subscribers? It's currently free for all to use and we're sure others would love to hear the answer to this one.
      https://www.177milkstreet.com/discussion/

      Best,
      The Milk Street Team

      1 votes
      0 comments
    • Layne S.

      It worked! I posted in the Q&A forum as well. Thanks so much for this recipe! It's very similar to a dish I had in Shanghai a few years ago and I was so happy to find and prepare it at home!

      0 votes
      0 comments
  • Geoff F.

    Is mirin too sweet to sub in for the sherry?

    0 votes
    1 comments
    • Janelle C.

      Hi Geoff,

      In a pickle, mirin is a fine sub for dry sherry.

      Best,
      The Milk Street Team

      0 votes
      0 comments
Down arrow

Taiwanese Five-Spice Pork with Rice (Lu Rou Fan)

Get Ready to Cook

6

Servings

40 minutes

Tip

Don’t use regular soy sauce; when reduced during cooking in this recipe it will become too salty. And don't use cooking sherry, which contains added salt; use an inexpensive dry sherry.

Ingredients
  • pounds ground pork

  • 1

    cup low-sodium soy sauce, divided, plus more, as needed

  • ¼

    cup grapeseed or other neutral oil

  • 12

    ounces shallots, halved and thinly sliced

  • 10

    medium garlic cloves, minced

  • cups dry sherry

  • cup packed dark brown sugar

  • 2

    tablespoons five-spice powder

  • 1
  • Steamed rice, to serve

  • 3

    scallions, thinly sliced on bias

Step 1 of 4

Marinate the pork

pounds ground pork
¼
cup low-sodium soy sauce

In a medium bowl, mix the pork with ¼ cup of the soy sauce. Cover and refrigerate until needed.

Step 2 of 4

Brown the shallots

¼
cup grapeseed or other neutral oil
12
ounces shallots, halved and thinly sliced
10
medium garlic cloves, minced 

In a large Dutch oven over medium, heat the oil until shimmering. Add the shallots and cook, stirring, until deeply browned, 15 to 20 minutes. Add the garlic and cook, stirring constantly, until the garlic is fragrant and just beginning to brown, about 1 minute.

Step 3 of 4

Cook the sauce

cups dry sherry
cup packed dark brown sugar
2
tablespoons five-spice powder
¾
cup low-sodium soy sauce

Add the sherry, sugar, five-spice and remaining ¾ cup soy sauce. Stir until the sugar has dissolved, then increase to high and bring to a boil. Cook, stirring, until reduced and syrupy and a spoon leaves a clear trail, about 5 minutes.

Step 4 of 4

Cook the pork

1
tablespoon unseasoned rice vinegar
Steamed rice, to serve
3
scallions, thinly sliced on bias

Reduce to low and allow the simmering to subside. Add the pork, breaking it into small pieces. Cook, stirring, until the meat is no longer pink, 5 to 7 minutes. Stir in the vinegar, then taste and add soy sauce, if needed. Spoon steamed rice into individual bowls, top with the pork and sprinkle with scallions.

Milk Street Bowtie Logo

Done!

Did you enjoy this recipe?

Taiwanese Five-Spice Pork with Rice (Lu Rou Fan)

Want more?

See More Mains
AUGUST 2020
DEBUYER NONSTICK COOKWARE

$299.85 VALUE

Success!

Thank you for participating in our monthly giveaway!
Entry Form
How we use your email.

Your email address is required to identify your giveaway entry as well as communications from Milk Street. We will not share or rent your email address. You can unsubscribe from receiving our emails at any time.

Enter the Milk Street Giveaway